Choose names for Google, not people

“There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things.” - Phil Karlton AngularJS was released in 2010 and revolutionized modern frontend development. In 2016, the AngularJS team published a new framework, written in TypeScript and incompatible with AngularJS. They also made the baffling choice to call this framework Angular 2. Mayhem ensued, confused developers talked to each other about incompatible frameworks. The excellent community documentation AngularJS had built in the form of blogs and StackOverflow answers became an active hindrance for people trying to learn Angular....

January 22, 2022 · 2 min · Philip Heltweg

Who wrote this shit?

It is a beautiful rite of passage for a bright-eyed junior developer to join a team, take some tasks full of enthusiasm, and have the life and joy sucked out of them one sprint at a time. Soon enough, they sit in planning meetings, miserably complaining, accusingly asking who wrote that shit. Their transformation to a full team member is complete. They have become one of us. I was once that bright-eyed junior developer....

January 9, 2022 · 2 min · Philip Heltweg

Master Thesis: Implementing a Structured Approach to Belief Revision by Deterministic Switching Between Total Preorders

Abstract Belief change research investigates how agents adapt their knowledge with potentially conflicting information. A common formalization is by epistemic states, abstract entities often represented by faithful preorders. Operators describe how epistemic states change with new evidence and are classified by which postulates they satisfy. Different approaches have been suggested for the problem of iterated belief change. Recent work introduces uniform revision that revises an agent’s beliefs based on one static total preorder, therefore lowering representational costs....

November 7, 2021 · 1 min · Philip Heltweg

Certification of Iterated Belief Changes via Model Checking and its Implementation

Note: An extended version of this paper has been published at the 7th Workshop on Formal and Cognitive Reasoning, you can find it here. Our paper “Certification of Iterated Belief Changes via Model Checking and its Implementation” got accepted to the 19th International Workshop on Non-Monotonic Reasoning (NMR-2021) at the 18th International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning (KR 2021). During the workshop I held a short presentation of the results....

October 27, 2021 · 2 min · Philip Heltweg

On Using Model Checking for the Certification of Iterated Belief Changes

Our paper “On Using Model Checking for the Certification of Iterated Belief Changes” got accepted to the 7th Workshop on Formal and Cognitive Reasoning (FCR-2021) at the 44th German Conference on Artificial Intelligence (KI-2021). During the workshop I held a short presentation of the results. You can find both the paper as well as the presentation slides here. Abstract The theory of iterated belief change investigates how epistemic states are changed according to new beliefs....

September 28, 2021 · 2 min · Philip Heltweg

Of judges, aliens and total preorders

I created this synopsis of some ideas from the paper “How to Revise a Total Preorder” by Booth and Meyer during the seminar on “Representation and processing of uncertain knowledge with logic-based methods” at the University of Hagen. The slides are from my final presentation of the topic (and might be more or less useless on their own). Abstract Adapting one’s world view in the light of new information is a central skill of intelligent agents....

April 9, 2021 · 1 min · Philip Heltweg

How to kill a dragon

“You’ll never forget your first dragon” used to be the promise of Tibia, a free 2D-MMO I played as a young teenager. I spend day after day playing Tibia, training skills with friends and exploring the world and still… never got to kill a dragon. Coming back With nostalgia rekindled by quickly burning out on WoW: Shadowlands I tried to check in my old account. Sadly, I did not only forget the password but also lost control of my email address....

March 15, 2021 · 4 min · Philip Heltweg

Wisdom from the Internet, content that influenced how I think about software (and life).

Finding needles There has never been as much information easily accessible to anyone as right now. The ease of publishing your own writing leads to new problems: The question is no longer where do you find content about a topic but what content is good and worth your time? To help you find the needle in the biggest haystack ever, here is my personal list of good content that influenced me....

December 3, 2020 · 3 min · Philip Heltweg

Machine learning basics: Machine Learning by Stanford University (Coursera) review and notes

The popularity of machine learning, data science and related disciplines is exploding and with it the amount of courses, books, block posts etc you are exposed to. I recently finished the relatively old but highly rated course Machine Learning by Stanford University on Coursera and wanted to take the chance to offer my review and notes I took. The course Although the course is old enough to be referred to as “classic” by quite a few descriptions I have read it is timeless in the sense that most good introductions are....

March 14, 2020 · 3 min · Philip Heltweg

Analyzing twitter: Import tweets with NodeJS and the twitter API

A tweet in the database is worth two in the API Working with tweets from the twitter API probably means importing data into your own database - the standard API does not provide historical data (only the last seven days) and has various rate limits. So regardless of the final goal in this blog we’ll explore importing tweets from the API into a database for future use. All done with NodeJS, written in Typescript and utilizing MongoDB as data store....

October 25, 2019 · 5 min · Philip Heltweg